Category Archives: Garden

Daylily Collage

Perennial Plant Profile: Daylily (Hemerocallis)

Bright, bold, beautiful blooms! Hemerocallis (Daylily) are some of the most vibrant and varied sunny perennials out there, with an incredible range of colours, combinations, and sizes. With so much selection, it’s no wonder that Daylilies are such a popular choice for garden beds—they can even be used as a lawn substitute in boulevards!

Light: Full Sun
Height: ranges from 10” to 40” (25-100cm)
Spacing: ranges from 12” to 36” (30-90cm)
Bloom Time: May to September, depending on the variety

Read More

USEDiStock-488094682cropped

Drought Tolerant Perennials for Hot & Dry Summers

While many of us love the summer sun and heat, some of our favourite plant varieties can find it too much to handle. Getting the hose out more often can help a great deal, and thankfully most city water restrictions do not apply to gardens or containers. If you’re looking to reduce your water usage without sacrificing your outdoor spaces, drought tolerant perennials are a perfect way to fill your gardens as they can thrive in the hot summer conditions.

Read More

USEDiStock-541146062 – Copy

Summer Growing Tips for Gardens and Containers

Bright sunshine and hot temperatures means it’s time to enjoy all those outdoor spaces: patios, balconies, pool decks, backyards, and the like. It’s also time to enjoy all our hard work from springtime garden and container planting, though the excess heat and humidity means we’ll have to add a few more items to our gardening “To Do” lists. Here are some of our top tips to keep those beautiful hanging baskets, window boxes, tropical planters, vegetable gardens, and perennial pollinator beds looking their best throughout the summer!

Read More

Pink Mandevilla

Bring the Tropics to Your Outdoor Spaces

Tropical houseplants are amazing, period. They offer beautiful foliage, stunning blooms, and help get all of us through those not-so-pretty winter days. As the weather warms up and the days get brighter and longer, we all tend to spend a lot more time outdoors so why not bring all those tropicals outside, too? Of course, you don’t have to move them outdoors; some varieties may be in very large pots that are heavy/difficult to transport, or you simply don’t want to move them outside just to bring them back in a few months later (and that’s okay!)
Tropical varieties that thrive in higher light conditions, like many flowering houseplants, will greatly appreciate soaking in that bright summer sunlight while simultaneously creating a gorgeous jungle paradise on your back porch. Plus, a large banana plant can double as a shade umbrella! But there are some very important factors to consider before taking your ficus outside, such as:

Read More

iStock-1252408827 – cropped

How to Sucker Your Tomatoes

What is a Tomato Sucker? A “sucker” is an extra shoot or leaves growing between the main stalk of the tomato plant and an established branch, often growing at a 45° angle from the plant.

Read More

Herb Flavour Pic

Herb Gardening: Planting and Caring for Flavour

Looking for a way to expand your taste buds in your own garden? Try growing fresh herbs! They are perfect in the garden bed and will also thrive on your balcony and patios in pots, planters, window boxes, and even hanging baskets. Choose a sunny location with easy access to water; even better, keep them close to your door so you can add fresh herbs to all your meals with little effort!

Read More

20240524_081747_resized-flipped

Planting Your Own Hanging Baskets and Containers

Fun Fact: Belgian Nursery plants and grows over 6,000 hanging baskets and 1,500+ planters and window boxes on site! So we know a few tips and tricks when it comes to planting your own containers for Annuals, Vegetables, and Herb plants:

Sun or Shade
Before you start selecting your plants, you have to know your light conditions. The amount of sunlight the intended area receives is one of the most important factors, simply because it’s the only one that’s out of our control. Petunias that are tucked under a porch overhang will not have enough energy to reach their full blooming potential, and Boston Ferns can burn to a crisp in the afternoon sun. If you’re unsure whether your site is considered full sun or part shade, these definitions can help:

Read More

USEDiStock-589985234resized

Choosing the Right Tomato

Here at Belgian, we grow a lot of tomatoes—over 30 varieties at last count! So it can be a bit overwhelming to walk up the Annual Greenhouse aisles and be confronted by so many choices, especially if you’re just starting on your tomato journey. Hopefully, reading the following will help you navigate the oh-so rewarding world of growing your own delicious berries (technically, a tomato is a fruit!)

Read More

banner with orange marigolds with green leaves in garden

Plant Profile: Marigolds

It’s no secret that when it comes to garden staples, especially annual flowering plants, Marigolds are near the top of the list. Whether they’re grouped together in a planter or lined up like tiny soldiers up and down a garden border, these adorable pompoms add gorgeous pops of colour wherever they go. And they have so many other attributes that rocket them to the top of our gardening wish lists, such as:

Read More

Dividing Perennials

Dividing Perennials in Spring

Reasons to divide your Perennials (after they’ve had at least 3 years in the gardens to grow and establish):
– Rejuvenation: keep the plants looking full and lush
– Propagation: turn one plant into two or more to spread around your gardens
– Community: share your perennial bounty with your friends and neighbours!

Read More

old man hands uprooting weeds in his garden

Preparing Your Gardens for Spring!

Ah, Spring! That most glorious of words, a sign that there are other colours besides ‘grey’ and ‘slush’ after a not-so colourful winter. The sun rises earlier, and weather reports use terms like “thaw” and “rising temperature” with sincerity. Plus we can start wearing less than 10 layers of clothing, oh happy day!

After a tough winter, our gardens may be looking a little worse for wear — guess that’s why they call it “spring cleaning”! Follow these helpful tips to prepare your outdoor spaces for another incredible year of flowers, fruit, and foliage:

Read More

Hellebores

Plant Profile: Helleborus (Hellebores)

Picture this: It’s a typical late winter/early spring, it’s still chilly outside, and your gardens are covered in white. But wait, what’s that poking through the snow banks? There’s no way anything would be awake this early?! But there it is, a flower bud actually pushing through the snow to the light above – the first Hellebore of the season!

Helleborus are incredible early spring bloomers, and we mean early spring! As soon as they feel a slight rise in temperature they’re ready to make their mark on the world, and they won’t let something as trivial as snow (or winter in general) get in their way. What a perfect Canadian perennial!

Read More

iStock-1455592978cropped

Spring/Summer Bulbs (Glads, not Daffs)

What do you think of when you hear “flower bulbs”? Tulips, Daffodils, Hyacinths, the usual. Now think of “Spring Bulbs” and what comes to mind? Tulips, Daffodils…well, yes, those all flower in spring, but they have to be planted in the fall. We’re talking about bulbs you plant in spring to get the gorgeous blooms anytime from spring through fall, depending on the variety. And while many are tubers, rhizomes, corms, and other non-bulbs, the point is that they’re all oh so pretty! Read on to learn about some of our favourites, which can be found in the Main Store in early spring, depending on availability.

Read More

Early Spring Flowers

Early Spring Bloomers

The snowbanks are slowly melting, you swear you heard a robin’s song in the trees, and your green thumb is starting to itch – all sure signs that spring is coming! But before you get too excited about this year’s veggie crop, there are still the cold nights and late frosts to consider. Most Annuals and new Perennials cannot tolerate frost, but that doesn’t mean we have to wait until late May before we can get a healthy dose of colour. There are lots of early spring plants that can handle a few light frosts while welcoming the arrival of warmer weather!

Read More

USEDiStock-149058414cropped

Get Started on Spring with Indoor Seeding!

Whether you’re looking to decrease your grocery bills, or in the market for a new hobby, indoor seeding is a great way to do both! Besides, nothing beats the flavour of a freshly picked tomato! So let’s get started!

Read More

Green Cucumber seedling on tray close up

Let’s Get Growing!

Believe it or not, now is the perfect time to start planning for indoor seeding! Ignore the chilly weather outside and set yourself up with some pots, potting mix, and seeds of your choice to get a head start on spring gardening.

If you’re a first-timer, vegetables like Peas, Kale, and Lettuce are super easy to start. Or maybe you’ve been around the seed trays for a while now and are looking to add to your perennial garden. No matter your expertise, so long as you follow the packet’s instructions (and have a little patience!) you’ll soon be eyeing rows and rows of cute little sprouts.

Keep It Simple         

The seed racks can be overwhelming, so keep in mind that each seed needs its own space. Keep your numbers manageable and seed only what you can easily commit to care for, including how much space you have for pots. Most seed varieties are viable for up to 3 years, though the first year will give you the best germination. If you find you have seeds leftover, store them in a cool, dry, dark location until next year.

Read More

Fall Bulbs Pic 1

Fall Bulbs: Plant Now for Spring Colour!

Fall is a fantastic time for planting, so take advantage of the cooler temperatures and plan(t) ahead for next spring! Many of your favourite spring bloomers, including Daffodils, Tulips, Crocus, Hyacinths, and Allium, arrive as bulbs in early fall and need to be planted before the deep frosts arrive. Fall bulbs need 12-16 weeks of cold weather before they can flower, and each variety has its own “temperature gauge” that tells them when the soil is warm enough to burst through to the open air.

Fall bulbs come in many varieties, including:

Read More

gardening with gloves and boots in the lavender garden

You Can Still Plant Perennials in the Fall!

Yes, there is still time to plant Perennials! Even though the days are getting shorter, Fall is still a great time to create new or add to your Perennial gardens since the (typically) cooler temperatures mean one less thing for your newly planted varieties to deal with. Those lower temperatures also make it more pleasant for us gardeners to get back into the dirt, doing all those physical garden jobs like pulling weeds and digging to fill in any bare spots. Added bonus: fewer mosquitoes!

Read More

Profile Garden Mum pic

Plant Profile: Garden (Fall) Mums

You know fall is coming when: the temperature starts to drop; the leaves start to turn brilliant tones; your sweaters come out of the storage closet, and your gardens start to lose their lustre. But not to worry, because now you can fill your beds and containers with beautiful fall bloomers like Fall Mums! Also known as Garden Mums or Chrysanthemums, they add a vibrant pop of colour and are available in shades of yellow, orange, red, white, and even pink and purple. The perfect addition to late season gardens and containers!

Read More

Itoh Peony

Perennial Plant Profile: Itoh Peony (Paeonia hybrid)

Light: Full Sun
Water: Deeply and regularly in first year; drought tolerant once established
Height and Spread: typically ranges from 24” to 36” (60 to 90cm)

     There are hundreds of Peony varieties out there, and until about 80 years ago only two types were available: Tree and Herbaceous. Tree Peonies are known for their giant and gorgeous blooms, while Herbaceous Peonies are much hardier and can handle cold winters. Then a certain doctor made it his life’s work to combine the best of both Peonies, and the hybrid Itoh Peony was born!

Read More

Shade Annuals

Annuals for Shade

When it comes to gardening, you can control just about every aspect except for one: sun exposure. Luckily, there’s a vast selection of Annuals that are just made for the shade! Belgian keeps all the Shade Annuals in Greenhouses #8 to 11 (Sun Annuals are in #12 to 20) so it’s easy to find the perfect addition to your shady sites!

What Do We Mean By “Shade” Annuals?

All plants need some level of sunlight, and many varieties can thrive with fewer hours and/or lower energy levels. These shade-loving Annuals could burn to a crisp in the hot midday sun, so give them the protection they need, especially in the afternoon, to keep them happy and healthy.

Read More

Sun Annuals

Annuals for Sun

Here at Belgian, we transplant and grow thousands and thousands of Annuals, just for you! And to keep things running smoothly, we’ve organized our Annual Greenhouses into Sun (#12 to 20) and Shade (#8 to 11). So let’s take a look at the latter, shall we?

What Do We Mean By “Sun” Annuals?

All plants need sunlight, and some require more of the sun’s rays than others. Varieties that need and thrive on 6+ hours of direct sunlight are deemed “Sun” Annuals, while those that would cook and burn in such conditions are for “Shade”.

Full Sun vs Part Sun

We try to have as much plant care information on our Annual signs as possible; you may see some state “Full Sun” or “Sun to Part Sun” but what exactly does this mean?

Read More

Veggie Raised Beds

Planning Your Vegetable Garden: Raised Beds

A lot of people are thinking about expanding their veggie garden by using raised beds, and that’s great! There are lots of advantages to having raised beds: reduced strain on your back, weed control, good drainage, protection from critters and other pests nibbling on your tender greens, etc. There are many types of raised beds out there, from simple wooden boxes to metal troughs, and some even have legs! We prefer ‘bottomless’ beds which are open to the ground below to allow roots to go as deep as they want, which then results in strong, healthy plants.

Read More

Perennial Fruit

Perennial Profile: Perennial Fruit and Vegetables

There is nothing better than picking your own fresh fruit straight from the vine, or runner, or cane for that matter! Soaking up all that sunshine and deep waterings means extra fresh flavour, not to mention the lack of being packed on a transport truck for thousands of miles. So why not add to your growing edible gardens with Belgian’s selection of Perennial Fruit and Vegetables?

First, the basics: nearly every Perennial Fruit and Vegetable needs a full sun location (at least 6 hours per day) and regular watering, especially in the first few years of growth and while it’s fruiting. Most varieties will take at least 2 years before you get a decent harvest, though some can take up to 7! And each has its own flowering and fruiting seasons; check the individual tags for even more detailed information on planting, pollinating, harvesting, and pruning needs.

Read More

Veggie Garden Plots

Planning Your Vegetable Garden: In-Ground Plots

There’s something about growing your own food that is oh so satisfying, even if it’s just a few tomatoes or a handful of sweet green peas. Best of all, growing vegetables and other edible plants is surprisingly easy and will only reap benefits for you, your family, and your neighbours if you seeded too many zucchini!

Find Your (Sun)Light
You can change your soil and you can change your watering habits, but you can’t change the sun. Discover where it shines on your potential garden beds, and for how long, to determine your ideal location. Always go for the sunniest location you can find, as most vegetables and herbs require full sun (6 hours in the afternoon at minimum, ideally 8+ hours every day).

Read More

Annual Perennial

Annuals or Perennials: What’s the Difference?

As you walk through Belgian Nursery during the busy Spring season, you may wonder we have a “Perennial Centre” and “Annual Greenhouses” – aren’t all plants the same? They all need sun, water, soil, airflow, maybe some fertilizer, so what’s the difference?

The Basics:

Annuals Bloom All Summer then Die Off In Fall — Plant Every Year

Perennials Bloom for 3-6 Weeks but Come Back Every Year — Plant Once

Read More

Senior woman applying fertilizer plant food to soil for vegetable and flower garden. Fertilizer and agriculture industry, development, economy and Investment growth concept.

Which Fertilizer Is Best? Well, it depends…

It’s amazing how plants can take such simple ingredients – sunlight, water, soil, air – and turn them into a four-course meal. But sometimes they need a little boost to keep up that vitality, and that’s where fertilizers and other soil additives come in. They’re like multivitamins for your plants, and just like the vitamin shelves at the pharmacy there are LOTS of options out there! Hopefully, the following can help you sort out which fertilizer/additive/combination is right for your plants.

The topic of fertilizing is a large, open-ended category since it literally means anything added to the soil, but we’ll keep the manures and peat moss to another blog. For now, we’ll focus on the three big letters: N, P, and K.

Read More

old man hands uprooting weeds in his garden

Preparing Your Gardens for Spring!

     Ah, Spring! That most glorious of words, a sign that there are other colours besides ‘grey’ and ‘slush’ after a not-so colourful winter. The sun rises earlier, and weather reports use terms like “thaw” and “rising temperature” with sincerity. Plus we can start wearing less than 10 layers of clothing, oh happy day!

     Here’s the thing, though. As the snow banks melt away they reveal…well, a bit of a mess. Our gardens may be looking a little worse for wear after a tough winter, but that’s why they call it “spring cleaning” after all! Follow these helpful tips to prepare your outdoor spaces for another incredible year of flowers, fruit, and foliage:

Read More

Bagged Goods Garden

Belgian’s Bagged Goods and Their Uses

We are all about proper plant care here at Belgian, so we try to carry items you’ll need to keep your plants happy and thriving. But what exactly is vermiculite? Do you really need to add charcoal to your pots? Which potting soil is best for which plants? So let’s shed some light on our Bagged Goods:

Potting Soils – use for both indoor and outdoor pots, planters, hanging baskets, etc.

All-Purpose: our “yellow” and “purple” bags are from two Canadian suppliers, Fafard and Lambert. Fafard/Yellow can be used for nearly any indoor and outdoor container planting need. Lambert/Purple is a lighter mixture thanks to its slightly higher peat moss content, and very similar to what we grow all of our Annual crops (and African Violet soil that used to be available years ago); it’s great for indoor planting, seeding, and propagating.

Read More

Early Spring Bloomers pic

Early Spring Bloomers

     It’s happening! The snow banks are melting, your green thumb is itching, and was that a robin you just heard? Yes, all signs are pointing to that oh-so glorious word SPRING! But, as all Canadians are painfully aware, this magical thaw won’t reach its peak overnight, so we’ll all have to be patient as we wait for Mother Nature to get all the cold nights and late frosts out of her system. We’ve done it before, we can do it again; luckily, we don’t have to wait too long before getting our dose of colour.

     Most annuals, and newly planted perennials, cannot handle any kind of frost. Let’s say that again: Most Annuals and Newly Planted Perennials CANNOT Handle Any Kind of Frost! Seriously, we can’t stress this point enough, and this is why there’s an entire paragraph about how they can’t handle frost. Good? Great, let’s move on.

Read More

Tulips 6 colours edited

Tulips: A History

Believe it or not, the humble tulip has a long history filled with intrigue, theft, get-rich-quick schemes, a royal birth, and even the liberation of an entire country! Those are some pretty huge events, and all thanks to a small, unassuming bulb:

Read More

iStock-1281956563

Lifting and Storing Tender Bulbs

As much as we love our gorgeous spring bulbs (the Glads, the Dahlias, the Calla Lilies, and all the rest) their beauty comes at a price: they cannot overwinter in our gardens. But that’s okay, because a little effort now will mean you can enjoy them again next year! Here’s how:

Note: For the sake of space (and a certain writer’s sanity), all varieties in question will be referred to as “tender bulbs” or just “bulbs”, even though most of them are corms/tubers/rhizomes/non-bulb beings.

What to Lift: You’ll need to lift any and all of your tender bulbs before the hard frost hits, including Dahlia, Gladiola, Calla Lily, Freesia, Anemone (not the Perennial/Japanese varieties), Ranunculus, Tuber Begonia, Tuberose, Caladium, and Canna Lily.

Read More

Rudbeckia (2)

Fall – A Fantastic Time for Planting!

After these long, hot and dry days of summer, some of our gardens and planters may be looking a bit exhausted. Fall brings us shorter days, more frequent rainfalls (hopefully), and bearable temperatures for working in the flowerbeds. Now is the time to remove those pesky weeds, fill in some bare spots and replace those plants that just aren’t right. For your planters, consider adding some fall flowers like Ornamental Cabbage & Kale or Garden Mums. While these varieties are not hardy for our winters, they’ll last well into the fall and even handle some light frosts. 

Consider adding some varieties of perennials that are fall or even late-fall blooming to support your backyard pollinator friends (like bees, butterflies and hummingbirds) so they have enough food for the upcoming winter season. Here are just a few great options that come to mind:

Sedum (Stonecrop), Aster (Michaelmas Daisy), Achillea (Yarrow), Agastache (Anise Hyssops), Rudbeckia (Black-Eyed Susan), Echinacea (Coneflower), Echinops (Globe Thistle), Monarda (Bee-balm), Prevorskia (Russian Sage), Ascelpias (Butterfly Weed), Eupatorium (Joe Pye Weed), Gaillardia (Blanket Flower), Helenium (Sneeze Weed), Helianthus (Perennial Sunflower), Heliopsis (False Sunflower), Calamintha (Catmint), Coreopsis (Tickseed), Salvia (Perennial Sage), and Lavendula (Lavender).

Browse through the Perennial Center to see what is blooming for inspiration OR I’m sure a wander through your neighborhood can also be a great inspiration!

Garlic is another fall task. Even though garlic can be planted in spring or fall, I find that when it’s planted in the fall it produces better heads with more intense flavour!‎ Start by picking a spot in your vegetable or herb garden, divide the head of garlic into cloves and plant them in a row about 3 inches deep. Harvest in mid to late summer and enjoy!

 

iStock-680166294 – Copy

The Benefits of Weeding!

What is a weed?

My definition of a weed is any plant that grows where you don’t want it to be! Read More

20210622_110903

Benefits of Mulching

      When it comes to mulching your garden, there’s really no downside! And with a wide range of mulching options to choose from, you can personalize the look of your gardens while giving your plants all the benefits that mulching can provide, including:

Read More

usediStock_84052277_XLARGE – Copy

Grow Your Own Cut Flowers!

What could be better than creating a stunning bouquet that you have grown yourself? Some of the most memorable bunches of flowers I have received are hand-picked by my children (true, at times they are mostly dandelions, but still!). My favourite hand-made bouquet has been a simple vase filled with Garlic Chives – they have white blooms that last for weeks!

Use bold blossoms like Peonies and Iris or tall spiky flowers like Delphiniums, Veronica and Lavender, then use delicate flowers like Scabiosa or Lady’s Mantle to fill in or frame your centrepieces. Create designer masterpieces with “in season” flowers inspired by an afternoon in your garden.

Try different textures like Rosemary, Lady’s Mantle, and Celosia. Remember that some of the standard plants in your garden can help fill in your creations as well, like adding a few Hosta leaves for a bold foliage feel. Herbs are also a fun addition – beyond adding just flowers and greenery you will also be adding delicious aromas!

But the absolute best part of having a cut flower garden is that you can share it with everyone! A beautiful vase filled with a home-grown, handmade bouquet would make a spectacular hostess gift.

Steps and Tips:

The best time to cut your flowers is either before the morning dew has dried or in the early evening.

Cut above a node or leaf to let even more blooms grow for future bouquets.

Place stems in lukewarm water as soon as you cut them.

Prior to placing your cut flowers in their arrangements, cut their stems on a slight angle and place in a vase of warm water.

Change the vase’s water every few days.

Take time to enjoy them!

Man digging up vegetables on a garden, his legs and a spade in focus. Work concept

Seed Starting Part 5: Hardening Off and Planting Out

     Well, we’ve made it. It took a lot of hard work, planning, and table space, but we are finally ready to put all those adorable seedlings outside…almost. You’ve been so patient with them, they just need a little more time before they can grow big and strong outside (and you can reclaim your tables and shelves!).

Read More

USED -iStock-474877371 cropped

Seed Starting Part 4: Survival of the Fittest (Thinning)

Experienced gardeners know a simple truth: in order to have the best crop possible, you must choose which of your precious plants will live, and which have to be sacrificed for the greater good.

Okay, maybe that’s a little dramatic, but you’ve been watching these adorable seedlings grow for a few weeks and you may now find yourself, well, a bit attached to them. However, sometimes you must be cruel to be kind. After all, this is the main reason you seeded extras of your varieties, knowing that some wouldn’t germinate at all and others would have to be thinned from the crop. Plus, some of your taller varieties may need to be “potted up” into slightly larger pots, which means less space on your seeding station which means less plants so…*sigh* it must be done.

Read More

seed root on soil with sunbeam begining concept

Seed Starting Part 3: Planting, Finally! (10 Steps from Seed to Sprout)

At last! You have been so patient, getting all your supplies together, making sure you have the proper soil mix, and setting up your seeding station for all your future little sprouts. And now it’s time to put all that preparation to good use and get dirty!

Remember that mountain of information on your seed packets? Remember the all-important “Sowing/Start Indoors” date? No, no need to panic, you’ve still got plenty of time to double-check your dates. For vegetables, most of them want to be planted 4 – 8 weeks before the last frost, except for onions, leeks, and eggplants which take 10, and celery and celeriac prefer 12 weeks of cozy indoor growing. Flowering plants, both annual and perennial varieties, can vary but usually hit that 4 – 8 week window, as well.

Oh, one more thing! If you’ve got specific numbers in mind as to how many of each plant you want to end up with, make sure you sow a few extra of each variety just in case. This goes back to that tricky germination rate; some seeds just don’t take very well, no matter what you do to coax them out of hiding. So it’s better to have extra and then thin out the weaker ones later to get the best plants, but more on that in Part 4!

Ready to sow? Then let’s go!

Read More

Blog-bounty on a budget

Bounty on a Budget: Making the Most of Your Grow-ceries!

Vegetable gardening can be a fun, healthy summer tradition – and it can also help take a bite out of your grocery bills! Planting thrifty, productive crops is a great way to supplement your family’s diet with delicious garden-fresh produce right from your own backyard, with no cashiers between harvest and table. There are a lot of great strategies for getting big yields on a shoestring budget. Try these simple tips to fill your plate with freshness and maximize your return on investment. Read More

Blog – planting a bee friendly

Planting a Bee-friendly Garden

Why plant a bee garden?

Bees help us, a lot! As much as 3/4 of the food we eat depends on bees for pollination. And now more than ever, our bee friends could use a hand in return. This can be as easy and fun as potting up a planter or two, or scattering a few wildflower seeds in an unused section of your yard. Whatever the scale of your garden, we gardeners can make a big difference for our little buzzing buddies! Read More

Project_0443Josh Gabriel Photography Belgian Nursery 55th Aniversary

Fall vs. Spring Garden Clean Up

For most perennials, whether you cut them back in the fall verses spring is completely up to you. Before you start, determine which season gives you more time for working in the garden. And consider what may provide winter interest: many taller grasses or perennials with seed heads atop sturdy stems can look very attractive with frost/snow on them, even providing a place for wildlife, like birds, to rest. Read More

Copyrights © 2022 Belgian Nursery All Rights Reserved.       powered by Digital North.

X