...Perennials & Shrubs...

Perennials
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Belgian has over 1200 varieties of perennials, including Hosta, Hemerocallis (Daylilies), Astilbe, Butterfly Bush, Campanula, Heuchera (Coral Bells), Peonies, Lavender, Thyme, Vinca (Periwinkle) and Iris. We also carry Hardy Grasses, Hardy Climbing Vines, Groundcovers, Ferns, Rockeries and much more.

With our covered Perennial Centre there's no need to fear the elements; even rainstorms won't get in the way of your shopping! The Centre is open from mid-April to October, with our biggest selection of perennials being available during May and June. However we do carry a great selection of perennials all summer long! During the summer and early fall months, larger pots of perennials are also available.

Belgian's Perennial Centre is constantly and rapidly changing with every season. Along with growing thousands of our own perennials, new plants arrive from five different growers every week. Come and explore our Perennial Centre to see what additions you can find for your garden.



The advantage of a perennial garden is the nonstop selection of different plants. Whether you're looking for a brightly coloured rainbow of flowering plants, or want to feature different textures through foliage, your garden's overall look will depend on your personal choices. There are many ways to create a perennial garden and they can all add colour and beauty to your home. Perennials can also help to create privacy; using hardy vines on a fence or taller perennial grasses are great ways to soften the view of neighbours or busy roads. Create areas with groundcovers, such as Thyme or Vinca (Periwinkle) and reduce the areas that need regular mowing! We carry the Jeepers Creepers™ brand of groundcovers, which are “Down Low and Fun To Grow™”! Check out their website at www.jeeperscreepers.info for more great groundcover ideas, including ones you can even walk on!

Most perennials bloom for three to four weeks each year. Choosing a good selection of plants that have different flowering times can give you non-stop colour from early spring right through to late fall. Get ideas by reading magazines and books that show fully grown mature flower beds; you'll also gain valuable information on flowering times and the varying heights of perennials. Belgian offers the 'Perennial Gardening Guide' written by John M. Valleau and published in Canada. This helpful guide contains lots of information and a good selection of photographs. Belgian does not produce a catalogue or do mail orders or special orders. We suggest you come in, see what we have available and ENJOY!


Shopping for perennials this season? Check out Belgian's Perennial Card!
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For additional perennial information visit:  www.perennials.com



-open/close- -open/close-Success with Perennials – General Care & Tips

Light:

Perennials are available for sunny and shady locations and everything in between. Know your location, and then pick perennials to suit the conditions.

Full Sun
: Sun all day with little to no shade. Minimal shade only in the early morning or late afternoon, not exceeding a few hours.
Partial Shade: Direct sun shines on the area for approximately half the day. A tree canopy that allows some beams of light through and filtered light for the remainder of the day is also partial shade.
Full Shade: Shade all day with little to no sun. Generally under tree canopy or along the North side of a building, hedge, etc.
Deep Shade: No sun; under dense canopies of trees. These locations are usually very dry.

For most sun perennials all day sun is best. If your location is partial shade, afternoon sun would be preferred over morning sun. Shade created from a tree is suitable, as long as there is more sun than shade.
Click here for Sunny Perennial suggestions.

Shade perennials prefer shade for most of the day. If your location is partial shade, morning sun would be preferred over afternoon sun. Deep dry shade created from dense trees may require extra watering to compensate for the trees’ usage of water. Click here for Shady Perennial suggestions.

Water:

Water your plants in right after planting, and make sure to water perennials regularly until they are established. This can be one to two growing seasons, although if it is a dry season you may need to water more. Weather is the biggest factor when watering: temperature and the amount of rainfall will change when and how much you need to water. Spring and fall plantings are usually good with a weekly watering, but summer plantings will require more frequent watering, especially during heatwaves or drought. Give your plants a deep and thorough watering each time.

Established plants benefit from good deep watering every few weeks, depending on the weather and the plant. In the summer heat more frequent watering may be beneficial.

What about rain? 

A long, slow rain that accumulates water and absorbs deeply into the ground is the best kind of rain for gardens. It's best not to rely on thunderstorms as most of the water rushes away and does not have a chance to absorb into the ground, leaving your plants still thirsty.

Fertilizer:

A slow release perennial/annual garden food is best to add in the spring for most perennials. Just sprinkle the recommend rate (as found on the container) around your plants; avoid getting any on the new shoots or foliage of your plants. It's beneficial to ensure you have decent soil to start with, since a good rich soil will mean most perennials are fine to fend for themselves.

Soil Preparation:

Have your flowerbeds prepared before planting. A loose, richly organic soil is best for most perennials. Some beds may require the addition of soil - 3 way mix, black earth or top soil is ideal for this. Adding manure or compost is also beneficial to add nutrients to the area. Soil with a high content of clay and/or loam should be lightened with peat moss. Amending the soil before planting is the easiest way to prepare a good foundation for your garden, and is easily done when there are no roots or plants in the way.

Mulch:

Mulch looks good and, even better, it retains moisture and discourages weed growth. Just add 1 to 2 inches of mulch on flowerbeds after planting to complete this beneficial look. Add 1” every other year to keep the look fresh and weeds at bay. Keep the mulch a few inches away from the bases of your perennials to maintain air circulation around the plants.

Planting:

Keep the light requirements of your perennial in mind when picking a location. Soil should be amended prior to this time; i.e. adding peat moss, manure and/or bone meal. Dig your hole approximately one and a half times the size of your root ball. Remove perennial from its container, gently loosen the roots and place it in the hole. Fill in the rest of the hole with amended soil, maintaining the pot's original soil level. Build a basin with soil around the plant to catch water around its roots. Water regularly until established. Mulch to help retain moisture and reduce weed growth.

Maintenance:


Each perennial has its own individual needs. Use the grower's tags to find out what your plant requires. Below are some basic guidelines for most perennials. 

- Weed regularly, especially newly planted areas.
- Deadhead (remove old flowers) - On flowering perennials that look a little ragged, prune part way back after flowering with the exception of bulbs (like lilies, tulips, daffodils, etc.) or peonies. Many other flowering perennials respond well to summer pruning.
- Stake taller plants by the beginning of June and tie up the stems as they grow.
- Monitor for insects and diseases. Click here for information regarding Plant Problems, Insect and Disease Solutions.

For more individualized information about thousands of perennial varieties, visit www.perennials.com. This is a great resource with lots of information; please note that we do not carry all the varieties listed at www.perennials.com.

Dividing:

Dividing is usually best done in the spring just as the plants are starting to show signs of growth. Divide perennials when the middle of the clump starts to thin or die out; this is usually every 3 to 5 years with most perennials. This is especially good to do with Tall Bearded Iris and Siberian Iris. To divide, dig around the clump and lift it out of the ground. Knock off some of the soil, then use a spade or knife to slice the roots of the plant in half or quarters, depending on the size of the plant. Each piece should have a good chunk of the roots and eyes (growing shoots) to produce the new growth. Plant one of the divisions back in the hole (amend or add new soil if needed) and use the others to fill in areas of your gardens, start new garden beds or share them with your friends! 

Clean Up –Fall or Spring?

It doesn’t typically matter for perennials to be cleaned up in the fall or the spring. The timing is primarily up to you; undoubtedly when you have the most time and/or the weather is nice is a great time to clean up your flowerbeds. Pruning by hand is the best way, however for larger gardens using hedge shears or a line trimmer (especially for larger grasses) makes the task easier. If you choose to clean up in the spring, many perennial leaves like Hostas and Daylilies usually just pull right off with no snips required! There are some perennials that are best left until spring when it comes to trimming, such as Coral Bells, Bergenia, and many rock garden or alpine plants. Just a quick clean-up of brown or icky leaves and these perennials are ready for another year!

Before you trim, consider winter interest. Many grasses look wonderful with a dusting of snow on them. Perennials like Sedum and Russian Sage look great with their dried flower heads. If you find you don't like the look, simply wait for a mild winter day and just chop them off.

-open/close- -open/close-Success with Hardy Vines – General Care & Tips

Vines play a unique role in the garden, becoming part of nature’s landscape and taking the form of the objects they cover. When selecting your vine it is important to know the climbing method best suited to your structure.

Included are listings of different vine growth habits to help you make the best selection. There are different types of vines which can create beautiful tapestries of flowers, foliage or both.

Uses:
· Covering Fences
· Providing Privacy
· Creating Garden Rooms
· Housing Birds
· Keeping the South wall of your home cool, saving you money!

Many vines grow slowly in their first year as they focus their energy into root growth. If you're not seeing signs of vigorous growth on your freshly planted vine, don't be concerned! Your vine is likely busy underground getting a solid root system established to support its growth in the years to come.

1st Year: Root Growth
2nd Year & On: Vine Growth


Light:

Vines are available for different light requirements. Know your location, then pick your vine to suit the conditions.
Full Sun: Sun all day with little to no shade. Minimal shade only in early morning or late afternoon, not exceeding a few hours.
Partial Shade: Direct sun shines on the area for approximately half the day. A tree canopy that allows some beams of light through and filtered light for the remainder of the day is also partial shade.
Full Shade: Shade all day with little to no sun. Generally under tree canopy or along the North side of a building, hedge, etc.
Deep Shade: No sun; under dense canopies of trees. These locations are usually very dry.

Water:

Regular watering will be an important step in establishing your new vine during its first season. Further watering may be required in following seasons depending on the individual plant requirements, its location and weather conditions (i.e. dry season).

Fertilizer:

Granular Fertilizer may be worked into the soil (at recommended rates) or a water-soluble fertilizer can be used monthly during the growing season. Adding manure or compost prior to planting will help add nutrients to the soil for climbing vines.

Mulch:

Mulch looks good, but even better, it will retain moisture and decrease weed growth. Add 1 to 2 inches of mulch on flowerbeds after planting to complete this beneficial look. Add 1” every other year to keep the look fresh and weeds at bay.

*Tip: Clematis like their roots to be in cooler temperatures. Apply a thick layer of mulch on Clematis to keep their root systems strong and healthy.

Planting:

Pick your location, keeping in mind the light and water requirements of your vine. Make sure an appropriate structure is provided for the vine to cling to. Dig your hole approximately twice the size of your root ball. Soil should be amended prior to this time; i.e. adding peat moss, manure and/or bone meal. Remove vine from container, gently loosen the roots, place in hole and fill in with amended soil, maintaining the soil level. Build a basin with soil around vine to catch water around roots. Water regularly until established. Mulch to help retain moisture and reduce weed growth.

Maintenance:

Pruning: Some pruning of your vine may be necessary in order to achieve a desired shape or to promote growth. This is generally done immediately after flowering. Remember, some vines' flowers turn to berries in the fall so you may decide to not prune at all.  Guidelines for how to prune Clematis and Wisteria are below:

Clematis Pruning: A spring-blooming Clematis should be pruned right after flowering; if you wait until fall or winter you will be cutting off next year’s flowers. Clematis that bloom in summer can be pruned to shape at anytime in the winter, as this variety blooms on new growth. The odd variety re-flowers in the same season; it's best to avoid pruning these varieties, although a hard winter pruning every 3 years will help to give you some control.

Wisteria Pruning:
Wisteria flowers bloom on short lateral shoots close to the main branches, called spurs. Some extreme winters can freeze these spur, thus losing that year’s flowers. A system of spur pruning is recommended: once a framework of branches is established, lateral growths should be pruned off each year to encourage flower bud formation. Prune in two stages: first, after flowering (around mid-summer) trim the long laterals about 6”; then again in mid-winter, shorten these leaving only 3 or 4 buds to each lateral shoot.

-open/close- -open/close-Care and Tips for Hardy Vines by Variety with Pictures

Climbing Vines - Twiners:

A twining vine may need some encouragement to start growing onto your structure. This can be achieved by simply positioning or resting an active tip against your structure; the vine will instinctly wrap its stems around the support. If the vine travels in an undesired direction, prune or physically train it back to where you wish it to grow.

Full Sun to Part Shade
Blooms: July - Aug
Bittersweet
Celastrus               
A fast growing deciduous vine, the female has attractive clusters of brilliant scarlet-orange berries in September, provided it receives enough sun and there is a male planted within close proximity for pollination. Prune only as required for size in late fall after berries are done. Often used on fences where there is room to grow; can reach up to 30 feet tall and wide.
Full Sun to Part Shade
Blooms: May
Chocolate Vine
Akebia quinata
A fast growing deciduous vine with rich green five-parted leaves. Produces chocolate-coloured flowers in spring and occasionally violet-purple fruit. Prune only as required for size in late fall after berries are done. Suitable for covering fences, walls or pergolas; ideally, once planted they should not be moved. Grows up to 15 ft tall and wide.
Full Sun with Shaded Roots
Blooms: May – Sept
Clematis
Clematis
Known as the ‘Queen of Vines’ this hardy deciduous vine grows 5 to 8 feet per year. A profuse bloomer with showy flowers in an array of colours: violet, purple, mauve, white, pinks and reds. A trellis or fence will need to be provided, as well as a loamy soil and a cool, moist root zone – this can be achieved by planting a perennial in front and/or mulching. Branches will require full sun to bloom profusely.
  A spring-blooming Clematis should be pruned right after flowering; if you wait until fall or winter you will be cutting off next year’s flowers. Clematis that bloom in summer can be pruned to shape at anytime in the winter, as this variety flowers on new growth. The odd variety re-flowers in the same season; it's best to avoid pruning these varieties, although a hard winter pruning every 3 years will help to give you some control.
Full Sun to Full Shade
Blooms: June
Dutchman’s Pipe
Aristolochia                       
A deciduous fast grower with very large dark green leaves which hide purplish-brown, pipe-shaped flowers. Best grown on arbours, pergolas, trellises and fences. Prune only as required for size in late fall or early spring. Grows up to 30 feet tall and wide.
Full Sun to Part Shade
Blooms: May
Hardy Kiwi
Actinidia                         
A striking vine with remarkable tri-coloured leaves that are half creamy white, half lush green and flushed with pink tips at maturity. Blooms are small, white and fragrant. ‘Issai’ is a self-fertile variety occasionally producing small fruit in September to October. Tolerates sun but will perform best in light shade. Like Clematis, a cool root zone is required and is ideal for fences, pergolas, trellises and walls. Grows to 15 feet.
Full Sun to Full Shade
Blooms: May - Sept
Honeysuckle
Lonicera                
Clusters of trumpet-shaped flowers with a very long blooming season. Attracts hummingbirds! This deciduous vine can handle any light location in the garden, however the more sun it receives the more flowers will grow. Grow on fences, trellises and obelisks in a spot where you can watch hummingbirds enjoying the nectar! Prune only to control size by removing weak or congested branches in late winter or early spring. Usually arching or draping over at 5 feet, Honeysuckles can grow up to 10 feet tall and wide.
Full Sun to Full Shade
Berries: Aug - Sept
Porcelain Ivy
Ampelopsis                           
Grown for its outstanding foliage and fruit, this deciduous vine features large lobed green leaves speckled with white and pink. Greenish flowers are followed by stunning bright amethyst-blue berries. Primarily a twining vine, this ivy also uses tendrils to climb. A vigorous grower, growing 10 feet per season and dying back to the ground each year. Ideally plant in a sheltered part of the garden in rich loamy soil. Either remove dead branches each spring or leave them for the new growth to climb on. Grows up to 10 feet tall and 30 feet wide.
Full Sun to Part Shade
Blooms: June - Sept
Silver Lace Vine
Polygonum              
A very fast grower, this vine features large clusters of tiny white flowers, creating a carpet that covers its fine bright green foliage from summer until fall. Quick to establish, Silver Lace Vine can grow up to 12 feet in the very first year! A speedy grower perfect for covering porches, pergolas, fences and pretty much anywhere you want a natural cover. Blooms on new wood, so pruning can be done anytime right up until spring to control size. Drought tolerant once established. Grows up to 30 feet tall and wide.
Full Sun to Part Shade
Blooms: June - Sept
Trumpet Vine
Campsis             
Large trumpet-shaped blooms (up to 3” long) form in clusters of red, orange or yellow. Loved by hummingbirds! This dense, woody deciduous vine has coarsely-toothed green leaves. Partially self-clinging vine with aerial roots that also help to attach to structures, it needs to be grown on strong supports to bear the mature plant's weight. A quick cover for fences, arbours, trellises or walls, but usually takes a few years to establish itself before flowering. Blooms on new growth, so early spring pruning will not affect the flowering. Prune to control size in late fall through early spring. A vigorous spreader which can self-seed and spread by underground suckers. Grows 15 to 30 feet tall and wide.
Full Sun
Blooms: June - July
Wisteria
Wisteria sinensis                                       
A fast growing, strong vine that is best trained on a very tall (at least 8 feet in height) and sturdy structure since it can become extremely heavy. Long bright green leaves composed of leaflets are deciduous. Features long pendant-like fragrant clusters of violet, blue, pink or white flowers in spring, followed by attractive greenish to brown fruits shaped like pea pods. Wisteria may take several years to reach flowering state; careful training and pruning from an early stage is best. Sparse fertilizer is required for this vine as overfeeding will encourage foliage growth at the expense of flower buds. Grows up to 30' tall and wide.
  Wisteria flowers bloom on short lateral shoots close to the main branches, called spurs. Some extreme winters can freeze these spur, thus losing off that year’s flowers. A system of spur pruning is recommended: once a framework of branches is established, lateral growths should be pruned off each year to encourage flower bud formation. Prune in two stages: first, after flowering (around mid-summer) trim the long laterals about 6”; then again in mid-winter, shorten these leaving only 3 or 4 buds to each lateral shoot.


Climbing Vines - Clingers:

Clinging vines may twist and twine but their primary method of climbing is by their clinging rootlets or adhesive-like pads. Clingers will attach themselves to tree trunks, rocks or masonry with only a little training to get them started. Some also grow tentacles that help hold on as they twist and twine.

Full Sun to Full Shade
Berries: Sept - Oct
Big Leaf Wintercreeper
Euonymus                  
This evergreen vine features glossy, cupped, medium green leaves with a fall show of orange berries. Inconspicuous green blooms in spring produce the berries in June, later splitting open to reveal orange seeds in fall. Can be used as a groundcover or trained to climb if structure is provided. Prune to shape in late winter or early spring. Clings by rootlets. Grows up to 8 feet tall and wide.
Full Sun to Full Shade
Berries: Sept - Oct
Boston Ivy
Parthenocissus tricuspidata ‘Veitchii’      
Boston Ivy is a wonderful vine with elegant, dark green glossy foliage which turns vivid scarlet in autumn. Its leaves are a very distinctive three-lobed shape. Inconspicuous flowers are followed by clusters of dark blue berries (a favourite to birds) which become visible in autumn once leaves start to drop. Related to ‘Virginia Creeper’ and ‘Engelmann Ivy’, these self-clinging vines use suckers and tendrils to climb and are sensational for covering stone walls, bricks, fences, posts or arbours. A vigorous grower and quick to establish with a tidy, flat growth habit. Drought tolerant once established. Grows 5 to 10 feet a year; up to 65 feet high and wide.
Full Sun to Full Shade
Blooms: June - July
Climbing Hydrangea
Hydrangea anomala petiolaris                
A self-clinging, deciduous vine with green glossy heart-shaped leaves which are occasionally semi-evergreen. Large lacy clusters of attractive white flowers appear in June on well established mature plants. Attractive on walls, fences or large trees, its self-clinging aerial roots makes this one of the best vines for clinging to brick or stone walls. Lateral branches can grow out as far as 3 feet from the supporting structure, giving this vine a unique look. The dried flower heads and reddish brown peeling bark add attractive winter interest. Pruning is only required on mature plants to control size. Trim after flowering by removing up to one-third of the plant. Can grow up to 40 feet tall and wide, however they are quite slow to start.
Full Sun to Full Shade
Berries: Sept - Oct
Englemann Ivy
Parthenocissus quinquefolia ‘Engelmanni’
Engelmann Ivy is wonderful vine with elegant, dark green foliage which turn brilliant red in autumn; its leaves are a very distinctive five-lobed shaped. Inconspicuous flowers are followed by clusters of dark blue berries (a favourite to birds) which become visible in autumn once leaves start to drop. Related to ‘Boston Ivy’ and ‘Virginia Creeper’, these self-clinging vines use suckers and tendrils to climb and are sensational for covering stone walls, bricks, fences, posts or arbours. A vigorous grower and quick to establish with a tidy, flat growth habit. Drought tolerant once established. Grows 5 to 10 feet a year; up to 65 feet high and wide.
Full Sun to Full Shade
Blooms: June
English Ivy
Hedera helix                         
This hardy species of ivy has 3- to 5-lobed evergreen leaves. Self-clinging with a vigorous growth habit, but may take a few years to establish itself. Great for climbing on walls, fences, large trees, training onto structures or even used as a groundcover. This ivy tolerates full shade, prefers part shade, but will also survive in full sun. Foliage has an attractive bronzy-red colour during the winter months. Protect from extreme heat and cold winter winds to avoid leaf burn. Drought tolerant once established. The only pruning required is to keep the plant at the desired size, and remove any long stems that may be caught by the wind. Grows up to 35 feet tall and wide.
Full Sun to Full Shade
Berries: Sept - Oct
Virginia Creeper
Parthenocissus quinquefolia
Virginia Creeper is a wonderful vine with elegant, dark green foliage which turn bright red in autumn; its leaves are a very distinctive five-fingered shaped. Inconspicuous flowers are followed by clusters of purplish-black berries (a favourite to birds) which become visible in autumn once leaves start to drop. Related to ‘Boston Ivy’ and ‘Engelmann Ivy’, these self-clinging vines use suckers and tendrils to climb and are sensational for covering stone walls, bricks, fences, posts or arbours. Vigorous grower and quick to establish with a tidy, flat growth habit; can act like a groundcover if it has nothing to climb. Drought tolerant once established. Grows 5 to 10 feet a year; up to 65 feet high and wide.






-open/close- -open/close-Sunny Perennials

Botanical Name

Common Name

Achillea

Yarrow

Alcea

Hollyhock

Arabis

Wall Cress

Armeria

Thrift

Artemisia

Wormwood, Silver Sage

Baptisia

False Indigo

Buddleia

Butterfly Bush

Campanula

Bellflower

Cerastium

Snow-in-Summer

Coreopsis

Tickseed

Dianthus

Pinks

Digitalis

Foxglove

Echinacea

Purple Cone Flower

Euphorbia

Spurge

Gaillardia

Blanket Flower

Gaura

Gaura

Geranium

Cranesbill

Grasses

Grasses

Helianthemum

Rock Rose, Sun Rose

Heliopsis

False Sunflower

Hemerocallis 

Daylily

Iberis

Candytuft

Iris

Iris

Lavandula

Lavender

Leucanthemum

Shasta Daisy

Liatris

Gayfeather

Lilium

Lily

Lupinus

Lupines

Monarda

Bee-Balm

Paeonia

Peony

Papaver

Poppy

Penstemon

Beard-tongue

Perovskia

Russian Sage

Phlox

Phlox

Potentilla

Cinquefoil

Rudbeckia

Coneflower

Salvia

Sage

Scabiosa

Pincushion Flower

Sedum

Stonecrop

Sempervivum

Hens and Chicks

Stachys 

Lamb's Ear

Thymus

Thyme

Veronica

Speedwell

Viola

Violet




Foliage that adds Texture:

Achillea, Arabis, Armeria, Artemisia, Baptisia, Cerastium, Coreopsis, Euphorbia, Geranium, Grasses, Iberis, Lavandula, Lupinus, Monarda, Perovskia, Potentilla, Salvia, Scabiosa, Sedum, Sempervivum, Stachys, Thymus


Spring Blooming (April-May):

Arabis, Armeria, Baptisia, Campanula, Cerastium, Coreopsis, Dianthus, Euphorbia, Geranium, Helianthemum, Hemerocallis, Iberis, Iris, Paeonia, Papaver, Phlox, Potentilla, Veronica, Viola


Summer Blooming (June-July):
Achillea, Alcea, Armeria, Baptisia, Buddleia, Campanula, Cerastium, Coreopsis, Dianthus, Digitalis, Echinacea, Euphorbia, Gaillardia, Gaura, Geranium, Grasses, Helianthemum, Heliopsis, Hemerocallis, Iberis, Lavandula, Leucanthemum, Liatris, Lilium, Lupinus, Monarda, Paeonia, Papaver, Penstemon, Perovskia, Phlox, Potentilla, Rudbeckia, Salvia, Scabiosa, Sedum, Sempervivum, Stachys, Thymus, Veronica, Viola


Fall Blooming (August-September):

Achillea, Alcea, Buddleia, Campanula, Coreopsis, Dianthus, Digitalis, Echinacea, Gaillardia, Gaura, Geranium, Grasses, Heliopsis, Hemerocallis, Lavandula, Leucanthemum, Liatris, Lilium, Monarda, Papaver, Penstemon, Perovskia, Rudbeckia, Salvia, Scabiosa, Sedum, Sempervivum, Thymus, Veronica, Viola


Drought Tolerant:
Achillea, Arabis, Artemisia, Cerastium, Echinacea, Euphorbia, Gaillardia, Gaura, Helianthemum, Iberis, Lavandula, Liatris, Papaver, Perovskia, Potentilla, Salvia, Scabiosa, Sedum, Sempervivum, Thymus


Moisture Tolerant:

Armeria, Baptisia, Campanula, Coreopsis, Digitalis, Geranium, Monarda, Rudbeckia, Viola


Ground Covers:

Cerastium, Euphorbia, Geranium, Iberis, Sedum, Thymus


Rock Gardens:

Achillea, Arabis, Armeria, Artemisia, Campanula, Cerastium, Coreopsis, Dianthus, Iberis, Papaver, Phlox, Potentilla, Sempervivum, Thymus, Veronica


Biennial:

A biennial is a plant that will grow for two years. They usually flower in the second year, after which they self seed and start over. It is best to plant these for two consecutive years to ensure constant blooms.

Alcea, Digitalis, Lupinus, Papaver



 

-open/close- -open/close-Shady Perennials

Botanical Name

Common Name

Aconitum

Monkshood

Aegopodium

Snow on the Mountain

Ajuga

Bugleweed

Anemone

Windflower

Arisaema

Jack in the Pulpit

Aruncus

Goat's Beard

Astible

False Spirea

Bergenia

Bergenia

Carex

Sedge

Chelone

Turtlehead

Cimicifuga

Bugbane

Convallaria

Lily of the Valley

Corydalis

Corydalis

Dicentra

Bleeding Heart

Epimedium

Barrenwort

Ferns

Ferns

Filipendula

Meadowsweet

Galium

Sweet Woodruff

Hedra

Ivy

Helleborus

Winter Rose

Heuchera

Coral Bells

Heucherella

Foamy Bells

Hosta

Plantain Lily

Houttuynia

Chameleon Plant

Lamiastrum

False Lamium

Lamium

Deadnettle

Lysimachia

Loosestrife

Pachysandra

Japanese Spurge

Persicaria

Fleece Flower

Polemonium

Jacob's Ladder

Polygonatum

Solomon's Seal

Primula

Primrose

Pulmonaria

Lungwort

Sagina

Irish / Scotch Moss

Tiarella

Foamy Bells

Tradescantia

Spiderwort

Tricyrtis

Toad-lily

Trillium

Trillium

Trollius

Globe Flower

Vinca

Periwinkle



Foliage that adds Texture:

Aegopodium, Ajuga, Astible, Bergenia, Carex, Chelone, Cimicifuga, Epimedium, Ferns, Galium, Hedra, Heuchera, Heucherella, Hosta, Houttuynia, Lamiastrum, Lamium, Lysimachia, Pachysandra, Persicaria, Polemonium, Polygonatum, Pulmonaria, Sagina, Tiarella, Vinca


Spring Blooming (April-May):
Ajuga, Arisaema, Convallaria, Corydalis, Dicentra, Epimedium, Galium, Helleborus, Lamiastrum, Lamium, Pachysandra, Polygonatum, Primula, Pulmonaria, Sagina, Tiarella, Trillium, Vinca


Summer Blooming (June-July):

Aconitum, Anemone, Astible, Bergenia, Carex, Filipendula,  Heuchera, Heucherella, Hosta, Houttuynia, Lamium, Persicaria, Polemonium, Sagina, Tradescantia, Trollius


Fall Blooming (August-September):

Aconitum, Anemone, Astible, Chelone, Cimicifuga,  Filipendula, Hosta, Tradescantia, Tricyrtis


Ground Covers:

Aegopodium, Ajuga, Convallaria, Epimedium, Galium, Hedra, Hosta, Houttuynia, Lamiastrum, Lamium, Lysimachia, Pachysandra, Sagina, Vinca


Deep Shade Tolerant:
Aegopodium,  Arisaema, Epimedium, Ferns, Galium, Hedra, Hosta, Lysimachia, Pachysandra, Polygonatum, Tricyrtis, Trillium, Vinca


Drought Tolerant:
Bergenia, Galium, Hedra, Lamiastrum, Lamium, Pachysandra, Vinca


Moisture Tolerant:
Aconitum, Aegopodium, Anemone, Carex Chelone, Cimicifuga, Corydalis, Dicentra, Ferns, Filipendula, Hedra, Hosta, Houttuynia, Lysimachia, Tradescantia, Tricyrtis, Trillium, Vinca

 

-open/close- -open/close-Hardiness Zones


At Belgian Nursery we are located in a Zone 5 Climate. To determine your hardiness zone simply use the chart below, which refers to the lowest winter temperature in your area. It is best to choose plants that are suited to your zone or colder. Plants with borderline hardiness should be planted in a protected area with added mulch and shelter for winter.

USDA Hardiness

˚F

˚C

Zone 1

Below -50

Below -46

Zone 2

-50 to -40

-46 to -40

Zone 3

-40 to -30

-40 to -34

Zone 4

-30 to -20

-34 to -29

Zone 5

-20 to -10

-29 to -23

Zone 6

-10 to 0

- 23 to -18

Zone 7

0 to 10

-18 to -12

Zone 8

10 to 20

-12 to -7




-open/close- -open/close-Hostas

Belgian has lots of Hostas, over 80 varieties! Hostas come in many colours, shapes and sizes. While they do flower they are mainly known for their foliage, and are an excellent choice for shady moist areas. There are some varieties that can tolerate part to full sun.    

Uses:
- Foliage creates interesting colour combinations and accents your perennial garden.
-  Mass plantings around base of trees, on hills for erosion control or as a pathway edger.
- In a "Hosta Garden" with an array of colours, shapes and sizes.

Light:

Although Hostas typically prefer shady locations, some varieties can tolerate part to full sun as long as they receive enough water. Generally, the yellow-leaved and the variegated green- and white-leaved varieties can tolerate some sun. Blue-leaved Hostas prefer shade, as their leaves will look burnt or not true to colour in a sunny spot.  

Water:

Hostas love water and perform best with regular watering in the spring, summer and fall. If they are left too dry they will not achieve their full size and beauty.

Fertilizer:

A mild transplant fertilizer may be used at planting; if you choose not to use a fertilizer, you can mix manure, compost or slow release perennial food or bone meal into the soil. Hostas will not benefit from feeding in the summer or fall seasons.

Soil:

A loose , richly organic soil is best. Hostas can tolerate clay and loam soils, but it should be lightened with peat moss before planting.

Mulch:

Putting mulch around your plants will help to retain moisture and decrease the amount of weed growth. Add 1 to 2 inches of mulch on flowerbeds after planting to complete this beneficial look. Add 1” every other year to keep the look fresh and weeds at bay.

Maintenance:

Hostas can be cut back in the late fall once they start to die back, or in early spring just before they start to grow.

It's very easy to divide your Hostas; either wait until the middle of the clump starts to thin or die out, or whenever they get to large for your liking. This is typically every 3 to 5 years for most varieties. Division is most often done in the spring, but Hostas are durable and can handle being divided in any season. To divide, dig around the clump and lift it out of the ground. Knock off some of the soil, then use a spade or knife to slice the roots of the plant in half or quarters, depending on the size of the plant. Each piece should have a good chunk of the roots and eyes (growing shoots) to produce the new growth. Plant one of the divisions back in the hole (amend or add new soil if needed) and use the others to fill in other areas of your garden, start a new garden plot, or share them with your friends! 

To keep your hostas looking their best, monitor for slug and snail damage, as they are the most common pest to hostas. Slug and snail damage can be easily recognised as holes chewed out of the centre of the leaves. Use snail and slug bait or snail and slug killer, along with diatomaceous earth, to stop them from eating your hostas.  Click here for information regarding Plant Problems, Insect and Disease Solutions.

-open/close- -open/close-Ornamental Grasses

There are a wide variety of different Ornamental Grasses - from short to tall,  with colourful foliage including green, gold, cream, red, white and blue. Some have striped leaves, while others have showy flower heads, spikes or seed heads. During the winter months, fallen snow on taller grasses create interesting displays.

Uses:
- Create a 'Grass Garden' and plant a combination of sizes and colours of grasses.
- Plant as a backdrop for perennials or annuals.
- Combine with other perennials or annuals to create an attractive show.
- As a low groundcover or as an edging.
- As a bold specimen plant.
- In large mass plantings and watch them wave in the breeze.

Care:

Light - Most grasses prefer sun to part sun locations, although there are some grasses that like more shade. When shopping for your new grasses, check the grower's tag for the individual light requirements.

Water - When planting your grasses, you will need to water them until they are established, which may take one or two growing seasons. If we have a rainy season you may not need to water as much, however a dry season means you'll need to water more often. During a dry, hot summer even established plants may need an extra drink.

Soil - A loose, richly organic soil is best for grasses. Clay and loam soils are okay, but should be lightened with peat moss before planting.

Fertilizer - Use an all-purpose, slow release perennial food. Mix in the soil before planting or sprinkle a little around existing plants in spring or early summer. 

Mulch - Putting mulch around your plants will help to retain moisture and decrease the amount of weed growth. Add 1 to 2 inches of mulch on flowerbeds after planting to complete this beneficial look. Add 1” every other year after to keep the look fresh and weeds at bay.

Maintenance - Grasses can be cut back in late winter or early spring before the new growth begins. Before you trim consider winter interest, as many grasses look great with a dusting of snow on them. However, be sure to trim them back in early spring to avoid damaging the new shoots.

Short Grasses:

Botanical Name

Common Name

Botanical Name

Common Name

Acorus

Sweet Flag

Helictotrichon

Blue Oat Grass

Carex

Sedge

Imperata

Japanese Blood Grass

Festuca

Fescue

Juncus

Rush

Hakonechloa

Hakonechloa

Lirope

Lily-tuft


Tall Grasses :

Botanical Name

Common Name

Botanical Name

Common Name

Calamagrostis

Feather Reed Grass

Phalaris

Ribbon Grass

Panicum

Switch Grass

Miscanthus

Silver or Maiden Grass

Pennisetum alopecuroides

Fountain Grass

Molinia

Moor Grass


* These are reference listings. We do carry most of the varieties listed, though some sell out quickly due to demand. Please come and visit us to see what is available. We do not produce a catalogue or do mail orders.

-open/close- -open/close-Groundcovers


Groundcovers are great for filling in bare spots in shady areas or where grass will not grow. They are typically low maintenance and a beautiful way help to reduce the amount of weed growth.

There are no set rules when it comes to spacing groundcovers. The closer you plant them together, the faster the area will grow in. Generally a 12” spacing would be suggested, with smaller plants needing less space between them and more aggressive growers being spaced farther apart. When planting, remember that the longer the area takes to fill in, the more maintenance (weeding, mulching, etc.) it will require. 

Care:

Light - Groundcovers are available for both shade and sun locations; see below for variety suggestions. When shopping for your new groundcover, read the grower's tag to see the individual lighting requirements.

Water - When planting your groundcovers you will need to water them until they are established; this may take one or two seasons. If we have a rainy season you may not need to water as much, however a dry season will mean you'll need to water more often. During a dry, hot summer even established plants may need an extra drink.

Soil - A loose, richly organic soil is best for groundcovers. Clay and loam soils are okay but should be lightened with peat moss before planting.

Fertilizer - Use an all-purpose, slow release perennial food. Mix in the soil before planting or sprinkle a little around existing plants in spring or early summer. 

Mulch - Putting mulch around your plants will help to retain moisture and decrease the amount of weed growth. Add 1 to 2 inches of mulch on flowerbeds after planting to complete this beneficial look. As the groundcovers fill in the area, they will create their own mulched effect and keep weeds out for the most part on their own!

Groundcovers good for sun:

Botanical Name

Common Name

Botanical Name

Common Name

Ajuga

Bugleweed

Lysimachia num.

Creeping Jenny

Arcyostaphylos

Bearberry

Paxistima

Chameleon Plant

Cornus

Dogwood

Phlox subulata

Creeping Phlox

Cotoneaster

Cotoneaster

Potentilla

Cinquefoil

Dianthus

Pinks

Sagina

Irish or Scotch Moss

Euonymus

Wintercreeper

Sedum

Stonecrop

Gaultheria

Wintergreen

Sempervivum

Hen and Chicks

Hedera

Ivy

Thymus

Thyme

Hypericum

St. John's-wort

Veronica

Speedwell

Houttuynia

Cliff Green



Groundcovers good for shade:

Botanical Name

Common Name

Botanical Name

Common Name

Aegopdium

Goutweed

Hosta 

Plantain Lily

Ajuga

Bugleweed

Houttuynia

Chameleon Plant

Arcyostaphylos

Bearberry

Hypericum

St. John's-wort

Convllaria

Lily of the Valley

Lamiastrum

False Lamium

Cornus

Dogwood

Lamium

Lamium

Euonymus

Wintercreeper

Lysimachia num.

Creeping Jenny

Galium

Sweet Woodruff

Pachysandra

Japanese Spurge

Gaultheria

Wintergreen

Sagina

Irish or Scotch Moss

Hedera

Ivy

Vinca

Periwinkle


* These are reference listings. We do carry most of the varieties listed, though some sell out quickly due to demand. Please come and visit us to see what is available. We do not produce a catalogue or do mail order.

-open/close- -open/close-Rock Gardening

In the right location a rock garden can be a beautiful accent to anyone's home. Once rockeries are established they are easy to take care of.

Care:

Light - Most rockery plants prefer full sun to part sun locations. When shopping for your new plants read the grower's tag to see the individual lighting requirements.

Water -
When planting your rockery plants you will need to water them until they are established; this may take one or two seasons. If we have a rainy season you may not need to water as much, however a dry season will mean you'll need to water more often.  During a dry, hot summer even established plants may need an extra drink.

Soil -
Rock gardens usually consist of well-drained gritty soil. If you find your soil is too hard for your plants, it should be lightened with peat moss before planting.

Fertilizer -
Use an all-purpose, slow release perennial food. Mix in the soil before planting or sprinkle a little around existing plants in spring or early summer. 

Mulch -
Putting mulch around your plants will help to retain moisture and decrease the amount of weed growth. Use either wood mulch or decorative stone for rockery beds to create the look you want.

Perennials good for rock gardens:

Botanical Name

Common Name

Botanical Name

Common Name

Arabis

Wall Cress

Lamium

Lamium

Ajuga

Bugleweed

Leontopodium

Edelweiss

Aquilegia

Columbine

Lirope

Lily-turf

Armeria

Sea Thrift

Myosotis

Forget-Me-Not

Aubrietia

Rock Cress

Oenothera

Evening Primrose

Achillea

Yarrow

Papaver nudicaule

Iceland Poppy

Antennaria

Pussy Toes

Penstemon

Beard-Tounge

Artemisia

Wormwood

Phlox subulata

Creeping Phlox

Alchemilla

Lady's Mantle

Primula

Primrose

Campanula carpatica

Carpathian Bell Flower

Saxifraga

Saxifrage

Cerastium

Snow in Summer

Sempervivum

Hens and Chicks

Dianthus

Pinks

Creeping Sedum

Stonecrop

Gypsophila repens

Babies Breath

Stachys

Lamb's Ear

Heuchera

Coral Bells

Thymus

Thyme

Hellaborus

Winter Rose

Veronica

Speedwell

Hemerocallis

Daylily - smaller types

Viola

Violet

Iberis

Candytuft

Yucca

Adam's Needle


* This is a reference listing. We do carry most of the varieties listed, though some sell out quickly due to demand. Please come and visit us to see what is available. We do not produce a catalogue or do mail order.


-open/close- -open/close-Attracting Hummingbirds & Butterflies

Butterflies are attracted by scent, and some flowers send out a more pleasing perfume than others. Hummingbirds are attracted visually, and especially like certain shades of red. Many red coloured flowers are good sources of nectar.

Butterflies and Hummingbirds may appear as soon as your flowers open, or it may take them a while to find your garden. If you don't see any there's no need to worry, simply enjoy the beautiful flowers while you wait for them to arrive.

A majority of the plants that attract Butterflies and Hummingbirds prefer full sun for most of the day, so it is best to choose a full sun location for your garden. If your location is partial shade, afternoon sun would be preferred over morning sun. Shade created from a tree is suitable, as long as there is more sun than shade.

Attracting Hummingbirds and Butterflies with perennials is both beautiful and enjoyable. The bright colours, textures, and scents of annuals and herbs are also very effective attractants. Because perennials are hardy and return year after year, this means a consistent food supply for your visiting friends. Click here to see more plant suggestions of annuals or herbs to attract these beautiful creatures.


Tips about Butterflies:

Butterflies are the adult stage of an insect, the caterpillar. You may not like caterpillars but just remember:

* no caterpillars = no butterflies *
 
If you use insecticides regularly in your garden you are killing off the beautiful butterflies you are trying to attract. You can plan for caterpillars being in your garden by planting a food source for them. This is fun to do with kids as they can watch for caterpillars and learn the process of how they transform into butterflies.


Perennials that attract Butterflies

Botanical Name

Common Name

Botanical Name

Common Name

Achillea

Yarrow

Hemerocallis

Daylily

Agastache

Anise-Hyssop

Heuchera

Coral Bells

Alcea

Hollyhock

Iberis

Candytuft

Aquilegia

Columbine

Lavandula

Lavender

Asclepias

Milkweed

Liatris

Gayfeather

Aster 

Michaelmas Daisy

Lonicera

Honeysuckle Vine

Astilbe

False Spirea

Lupinus

Lupine

Buddliea

Butterfly Bush

Monarda

Bee-Balm

Campanula

Bellflower

Penstemon

Beard-Tongue

Caryopteris

Bluebeard

Pervovskia

Russian Sage

Centaurea

Perennial Cornflower

Phlox

Phlox

Cleone

Turtlehead

Physotegia

Obedient Plant

Cimicifuga

Bugbane

Platycondon

Balloon Flower

Coreopsis

Tickseed

Rudbeckia

Cone Flower

Delphinium

Larkspur

Scabiosa

Pincushion Flower

Dianthus

Pinks

Sedum

Stonecrop

Echinacea

Purple Coneflower

Thymus

Thyme

Eupatorium

Joe-pye Weed

Tiarella

Foamflower

Gallardia

Blanket Flower

Veronica

Speedwell

Viola

Voilet

 

Perennials that attract Hummingbirds:

Botanical Name

Common Name

Botanical Name

Common Name

Ajuga

Bugleweed

Heuchera

Coral Bells

Alcea

Hollyhock

Heucherella

Foamy Bells

Aguilegia

Columbine

Hibiscus

Rose Mallow

Asclepias

Milkweed

Lonicera

Honeysuckle Vine

Buddliea

Butterfly Bush

Lupinus

Lupine

Campanula

Bellflower

Lychnis

Campion

Campsis

Trumpet Vine

Monarda

Bee-Balm

Clematis

Clematis

Penstemon

Beard-Tongue

Delphinium

Larkspur

Phlox

Phlox

Dianthus

Pinks

Physotegia

Obedient Plant

Dicentra

Bleeding Heart

Salvia

Sage

Digitalis

Foxglove

Scabiosa

Pincushion Flower

Hemerocallis

Daylily

Veronica

Speedwell

 
* These are reference listings. We do carry most of the varieties listed, though some sell out quickly due to demand. Please come and visit us to see what is available. We do not produce a catalogue or do mail order.

Plant with different flowering time, so there are flowers and food for all seasons.

Perennial List in Flowering Times for Hummingbirds and Butterflies:

 


Spring Blooming (April-May):

Ajuga, Aquilegia, Coreopsis, Dianthus, Dicentra, Iberis, Lychnis, Viola


Summer Blooming (June-July):

Achillea, Agastache, Ajuga, Alcea, Asclepias, Aster, Astilbe, Buddleia, Campanula, Campsis, Centaurea, Clematis, Coreopsis, Delphinium, Dianthus, Dicentra, Digitalis, Echinacea, Eupatorium, Gaillardia, Heliopsis, Hemerocallis, Heuchera, Heucherella, Hibiscus, Iberis, Lavandula, Liatris, Lonicera, Lupinus, Lychnis, Monarda, Penstemon, Perovskia, Phlox, Physostegia, Platycodon, Rudbeckia, Salvia, Scabiosa, Sedum, Thymus, Tiarella, Veronica


Fall Blooming (August-September):

Aster, Buddleia, Caryopteris, Chelone, Cimicifuga, Clematis, Digitalis, Echinacea, Eupatorium, Heliopsis, Hemerocallis, Hibiscus, Liatris, Monarda, Perovskia, Phlox, Physostegia, Platycodon, Rudbeckia, Scabiosa, Sedum, Thymus, Veronica, Viola


Biennial:

A biennial is a plant that will grow for two years. They usually flower in the second year, after which they self seed and start over. It is best to plant these for two consecutive years to ensure constant blooms.

Alcea, Digitalis, Lupinus



-open/close- -open/close-Plants & Tips for Attracting Bees

Did You Know?

  • Bees have been around for MILLIONS of years.
  • A bee’s wings stroke about 200 times per second, hence their “buzzzz”.
  • One bee can visit 50 - 100 flowers in a  single collection trip.
  • A colony have a population of 20,000 - 60,000 bees and 1 queen.
  • Bees are the only insect that produces food that is eaten by humans.
  • About 3/4 of the food we eat depends on bees for pollination!

 

Planting gardens that attract bees not only creates valuable homes for them, but can also increase the yield of nearby fruits and vegetables! Bees thrive in habitats with a wide variety of plants and flowers, and even a single pot of mixed annuals is a great way to attract bees.

Tips For Planting a Bee-Friendly Garden 

  • Single flowers are best as they have more nectar and are easier for bees to drink from.
  • Native species, heirloom and wildflower varieties tend to be better. They have more nectar than hybrid varieties.
  • Bees prefer flowers that are blue, yellow and purple. Bees have excellent colour vision, and these colours stand out to them.
  • Avoid using pesticides in your garden, which are very often harmful to bees.
  • Plant a diverse garden, with a good range of colours, cultivars and flowering times. Bees feed on a range of plants and need flowers from spring to fall!

 

Perennials for Attracting Bees

Agastache (Hyssop)

Goldenrod (Solidago)

Bee Balm (Monarda)

Lavender (Lavandula)

Black-Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia)

Beard-Tongue (Penstemon)

Blanket Flower (Gaillardia)

Poppies (Papaver)

Butterfly Weed (Asclepias)

Primrose (Primula)

Catmint (Calamintha)

Scabiosa (Pincushion flower)

Coneflower (Echinacea)

Stonecrop (Sedum)

Cornflower (Centaurea)

Shasta Daisy (Leucanthemum)

Foxglove (Digitalis)

Yarrow (Achillea)

Geranium (Cranesbill)

 


Shrubs & Fruit Bushes for Attracting Bees

Blackberry

Holly (Ilex)

Blueberry

Rhododendron

Raspberry

Viburnum

Butterfly Bush (Buddleia)

Willow (Salix)

 


-go to- -go to-Plant Problems, Insects & Diseases

Shrubs

Shrubs have many uses in the garden. They can add colour, texture, reduce erosion, add character, and create dramatic backdrops. Plant one on its own as a focal point to create a specimen plant, or use as an accent and plant with Perennials, Annuals, and other Shrubs to create texture and contrast. Shrubs are also great for foundation planting; they can be used as a base for your garden, or to soften house foundations, fences, and sheds.

Belgian offers a select assortment of Shrubs. We have chosen a unique collection for you to use as specimen or foundation plantings. Our Shrubs start arriving in April, weather pending, with the biggest selection in May and June. The best time to plant shrubs is in the spring to allow them to root in before winter. However, they can be planted throughout the summer and fall with sufficient watering.

Listed below are tips and care advice for shrubs that we carry in season.  Some varieties do sell out by summer.




-open/close- -open/close-Success with Shrubs - Care & Tips

Light:

Shrubs are available for sunny and shady locations and everything in between. Know your location and pick a shrub to suit the conditions. At Belgian we have chosen a unique collection of Shrubs for you to use as specimen or foundation plantings. Below are some general care tips for the Shrubs that we carry.   

Full Sun
: Sun all day with little to no shade. Minimal shade only in the early morning or late afternoon, not exceeding a few hours.
Partial Shade: Direct sun shines on the area for approximately half the day. A tree canopy that allows some beams of light through and filtered light for the remainder of the day is also partial shade.
Full Shade: Shade all day with little to no sun. Generally under tree canopy or along the North side of a building, hedge, etc.
Deep Shade: No sun; under dense canopies of trees. These locations are usually very dry.

For sun loving shrubs, all day sun is preferred. If your location is partial shade, afternoon sun is preferred over morning sun. Dappled shade from a tree is suitable, as long as there is more sun than shade.

Shade loving shrubs prefer shade for most of the day. If your location is partial shade, morning sun would be preferred over afternoon sun. Deep dry shade created from dense trees may require extra watering to compensate for the tree’s usage of water.

Water:

Water your plants in right after planting, and make sure to water regularly until they are established. This can be one to two growing seasons, although if it is a dry season you may need to water more often. Weather is the biggest factor when watering: temperature and the amount of rainfall will change when and how much you need to water. Spring and fall plantings are usually good with a weekly watering, while summer plantings will require more frequent watering, especially during heatwaves or drought. Give your plants a deep and thorough watering each time.

Established plants may benefit from a good deep watering every few weeks, depending on the weather and the plant. During the summer heat more frequent watering is beneficial.

What about rain?

A long, slow rain that accumulates water and absorbs deeply into the ground is the best kind of rain for gardens. It's best not to rely on thunderstorms as most of the water rushes away and does not have a chance to absorb into the ground, leaving your plants still thirsty.

Fertilizer:

A slow release perennial/annual garden food is best to add in the spring for most perennials. Just sprinkle the recommend rate (as found on the container) around your plants. Avoid getting any on the new shoots or foliage. It's beneficial to ensure you have decent soil to start with, since a good rich soil will mean most shrubs are fine to fend for themselves.

Soil Preparation:

Have your flowerbeds prepared before planting. A loose, richly organic soil is best for most shrubs. Some beds may require the addition of soil - 3 way mix, black earth or top soil is ideal for this. Adding manure or compost is also beneficial to add nutrients to the area. Soil with a high content of clay and/or loam should be lightened with peat moss. Amending the soil before planting is the easiest way to prepare a good foundation, and is easily done when there are no roots or plants in the way.

Mulch:

Mulch looks good and, even better, it retains moisture and discourages weed growth. Just add 1 to 2 inches of mulch to flowerbeds after planting to finish them off. Add 1” every other year to keep the look fresh and keep weeds at bay. Keep the mulch a few inches away from the bases of your shrubs to maintain air circulation around the plants.

Planting:

Pick a location suitable to the light requirements of your shrub. Soil should be amended in advance; i.e. adding peat moss, manure and/or bone meal as needed. Dig your hole approximately one and a half times the size of your root ball. Remove the shrub from its container, gently loosen the roots and place it in the hole. Fill in the rest of the hole with amended soil, maintaining the pot's original soil level. Build a basin with soil around the shrub to catch water around the roots. Water regularly until established. Mulch to help retain moisture and reduce weed growth.

Maintenance, Pruning & Winter Prep:

Each shrub variety has its own personal needs. Use the grower's tags to find out what your plant requires. Here are some tasks you can do once or twice a year that will help keep your shrubs and gardens looking their best:

- Weed regularly, especially newly planted areas.
- Deadhead; remove old flowers on flowering shrubs as needed.
- Prune Lilac, Rhododendron, Forsythia, Weigela and Spirea immediately after they are finished blooming. If you prune these too late or too early in the spring, you will be cutting off that year's future flowers.
- Butterfly Bush can be pruned back to 2 feet in late fall. Once they start to grow in the spring (usually June) prune any remaining dead branches.
- Use Dogwood branches or Holly in your winter greens pots!
- Prune standards (ornamental grafted trees) lightly each year to maintain shape.
- Shear or prune evergreen types in late winter/early spring.
- Wrap Japanese Maples and Rhododendrons for added winter protection.
- Monitor for insects and diseases.

Click here for information regarding Plant Problems, Insect and Disease Solutions.

You'll find our shrub variety listings below, with more specific guidelines and tips for the common shrubs that we carry.

Dividing, Pruning, & Moving:

Spring is usually the best time to move your shrubs, just as the plants are starting to show signs of growth. A light pruning prior to transplanting can be beneficial. Dig as large a hole as you can when lifting out your shrub; you want to maintain as much of the root ball as possible. Follow the planting instructions above. Some shrubs will transplant more successfully than others and most will take a few seasons to resume vigorous growth. Older mature shrubs are best left unmoved.

-open/close- -open/close-Flowering Broadleaf Evergreen Varieties with Pictures

Below you will find general descriptions and care advice for some of the common shrub varieties you can find here at Belgian. Hardiness, size and pruning can vary between cultivars; please read the grower's tags for specific information on your shrub. Please note: we do not carry large shade trees, fruit trees, or hedging shrubs. Some shrub varieties may sell out by early summer.

Boxwood (Buxus)
Blooms: May – JunePart Sun - Full Shade    
Dark glossy green leaves are often clipped or sheared into desired shapes. Attractive when planted as a specimen plant or as a low hedge for lining flowerbeds, garden paths or herb gardens. Flowers are insignificant, however irresistible to bees. Boxwoods are dense, slow growing and have shallow roots; avoid cultivating near these shrubs, and mulch to keep the soil cool and moist. Prune either in late winter or early spring, or after it blooms in summer. Grows 2 feet to 5 feet tall, depending on the variety.
Coral Beauty Cotoneaster
Blooms: MayFull Sun - Light Shade           
Vigorous groundcover with low arching branches and bright orange-red berries in the fall. Attractive glossy green evergreen foliage with pale pink to white blooms in spring. Use on embankments or in the border; its low, fast growing branches look great creeping over rock walls. Coral Beauty flowers on new wood; pruning should be done in late winter (before leaves appear) so flowers can bloom in spring. Grows up to 1.5 feet tall with a spread of up to 6 feet wide. 
Holly (Ilex)
Blooms: MayFull Sun - Light Shade                                
An upright rounded shrub well known for its bright red berries that persist all winter long. Creamy white flowers appear in spring, contrasting nicely with its glossy blue-green foliage. Holly prefers moist, slightly acid soil but will tolerate nearly all conditions. Only the female plants produce berries and they need at least one male planted nearby for pollination; generally, one male can pollinate up to 8 females, and is ideally planted upwind from the females. During extended dry spells, keep Hollys well watered and add mulch to retain moisture. Prune Hollys in early spring (when dormant) to remove winter damage and trim to desired shape. Grows 4 to 8 feet tall.
Rhododendron
Blooms: MayPart Shade - Full Shade      
Clumps of bell-shaped blooms form pom-poms on top of glossy evergreen foliage in early spring. This slow growing shrub prefers a shady location with moist, acidic soil that is high in organic matter. Rhododendrons should only be pruned immediately after flowering! Prune down to a bud or a growing point, keeping in mind that the removal of buds means no flowers for next spring. Feeding should also be done at this time; for best results, we recommend using a granular acidifying fertilizer. Carefully remove mulch, apply fertilizer according to container instructions, return the mulch and water well. Select a site that is shelthered from the Northwest winter wind and use a burlap wrap for added winter protection. Mulch heavily and keep well watered at all times. Grows 4 to 5 feet tall.
Adam's Needle (Yucca)
Blooms: JulyFull Sun - Part Shade         
A drought tolerant plant with long spiky upright leaves of solid green or striped with gold. Despite their cactus-like appearance, Yuccas are hardy enough to survive our harsh winters and make a dramatic addition to any garden. White bell-shaped flowers are formed on a central stalk, which can reach up to 8 feet tall and resembles a giant asparagus spear! Plant in masses or as a specimen. Provide excellent drainage, and avoid planting in high traffic areas as they have sharp pointy leaves. Prune off flowering stems after blooming and clean up dead leaves in spring. Foliage grows up to 2.5' tall.
-open/close- -open/close-Evergreen Varieties with Pictures

Below you will find general descriptions and care advice for some of the common shrub varieties you can find here at Belgian. Hardiness, size and pruning can vary between cultivars; please read the grower's tags for specific information on your shrub. Please note: we do not carry large shade trees, fruit trees, or hedging shrubs. Some shrub varieties may sell out by early summer.


Globe Cedar (Thuja)

Full Sun - Part Shade
This dark green compact shrub holds its round form very nicely. Plant in well-drained, moist soil, preferably in a location out of the cold winter winds. Water regularly when freshly planted and during extremely dry periods; mulch around the base to help retain moisture. Prune lightly to shape in early spring before growth starts. Grows up to 3 feet in diameter.
False Cypress (Chamaecyparis)
Full Sun - Part Shade
Bright golden-yellow foliage in sprays of flattened, scale-like leaves. Great little accent shrub for beds, borders, feature shrubs, in rock gardens and Japanese-style gardens. False Cypress prefers a cool, moist, well-drained and acidic soil. Protect from hot drying winds. Fertilize with an acidic evergreen fertilizer in late spring/early summer. Grows 3 feet across.
Winter Creeper (Euonymus)           
Full Sun - Full Shade
A very hardy broadleaf evergreen, tolerant of all soil types including moist, but not wet, soil. Foliage is round and glossy, available in green or variegated forms which can include shades of gold, cream and white edges or centers. Mainly used as a shrub when pruned to shape, however some varieties can also be used as a groundcover or self-clinging vine. Euonymus is usually a slow grower and requires little pruning. Early spring is the best time to trim the plant to shape: prune out all green growth on variegated types, and remove any branches or growth tips that have been damaged by winter winds. Grows up to 3 feet.
Dwarf Hemlock (Tsuga)
Full Sun - Full Shade
This slow creeping shrub with mounding habit prefers some shade and makes a great focal point with its bright green refined foliage. Prefers a moist, acidic soil. Use in rock gardens or Japanese gardens and keep protected from drying winter winds. A slow grower that requires little to no pruning; if shaping is desired, prune in early spring. Grows up to 5 feet.
Carpet Juniper (Juniperus)
Full Sun - Part Sun
Carpet Junipers form a dense mat of needled foliage, putting down roots as they spread, making them a great choice for erosion control. Ranging in height, spread and growth speed, Carpet Junipers are great in mass plantings, borders, rock gardens, cascading over walls or as a groundcover. They are very drought tolerant once established and thrive in a hot, dry location. For a dense or more controlled Carpet Juniper, prune up to one third off in summer while actively growing; this will encourage new growth from older branches. The prickly foliage can become slightly softer when given a good watering; water well the day before pruning or working around your Junipers, or wear long sleeves and gloves to avoid being scratched. Can grow from 6 inches to 3 feet tall and spread from 3 feet to 8 feet wide, depending on their variety.
Dwarf Mugho Pine (Pinus)
Full Sun - Part Shade
A dwarf, dense, round shrub tolerant of most soils including acidic, dry or sandy mixtures. Has great winter interest for foundation plantings, shrub beds, as a background for flower beds, in rock gardens or in mixed borders. Mugho Pines hold their compact form well. In early spring, prune to shape or remove up to half the new growth (also called candles) to create a more dense habit. Grows up to 3 feet tall and spreads up to 6 feet.
Dwarf Alberta & Nest Spruce (Picea)
Full Sun - Light Shade
These compact, slow growing spruces prefer a well-drained, sandy but moist soil. Dwarf Alberta Spruce is often the focal point of the garden with their very dense, cone-shaped forms, looking like a perfect little Christmas tree! Requires very little pruning to keep its shape in early spring; can tolerate a harder pruning of up to one third off to encourage denser growth. Nest Spruces have a small rounded habit with a broad flat-top, require little to no pruning and are very winter hardy. Avoid hot, dry, windy sites and water regularly, especially in times of drought. Nest Spruce grows to 3 feet; Dwarf Alberta Spruce grows slowly up to 8 feet.
Yews (Taxus)
Full Sun – Full Shade
Yews are unusual conifers since they produce red, berry-like fruit instead of cones. Their dark green needle-like leaves are not true needles, but glossy flat leaves that are soft to the touch. A great choice for many different applications, including shrub borders, foundation plantings, hedges or screens, as a feature shrub or a background for flower beds. These dense evergreens can handle almost any kind of soil so long as there is good drainage. Drought tolerant once established. Yews require pruning only to shape, however they can handle a harder pruning of up to one third off, which can occur in late winter, early spring or mid-summer. Almost all part of the Yew are poisonous, including its foliage and seeds. Depending on the variety, Yews can grow 10 feet tall by 3 feet wide, or up to 4 feet tall by 6 feet wide.  


-open/close- -open/close-Flowering Deciduous Varieties with Pictures

Below you will find general descriptions and care advice for some of the common shrub varieties you can find here at Belgian. Hardiness, size and pruning can vary between cultivars; please read the grower's tags for specific information on your shrub. Please note: we do not carry large shade trees, fruit trees, or hedging shrubs. Some shrub varieties may sell out by early summer.

Barberry – Japanese (Berberis thunbergii)
Blooms: July - SeptFull Sun - Part Sun   
These spiny-stemmed shrubs have attractive foliage which becomes more colourful in the fall. Colours range from deep red-purple, red, rosy-pink to brilliant golden-yellow shades, with arching branches and thorny stems. Their impressive thorns have made this shrub a great choice for decorative barrier hedges. The smaller species are ideal for rock gardens and specimen planting; while the mid- and larger-sized varieties have many uses including foundation plantings, hedges and backgrounds. Colourful flowers in summer are followed by bright fruit. Prune right after flowering in late spring or early summer, as Japanese Barberries bloom on the previous year's buds. Remove up to one third of the flowering stems to shape, or shear the sides and top for a hedge form. Barberries can also be left in their natural shape by occasionally pruning up to one third of the older branches right to the ground. Grows 2 feet to 6 feet tall.  
Butterfly Bush (Buddleia)
Blooms: July - SeptFull Sun                
This fast growing butterfly magnet features greenish-grey leaves on arching stems. They’re tipped with persistent fragrant flower spikes ranging in colour from pink, blue, purple, yellow and white. They prefer to be planted in moist, rich, well-drained soil out of the cold winter winds. Butterfly Bush should also be hilled up with mulch in the winter to protect the plant's crown from extreme cold. Pruning should be done in the spring, down to where new growth starts (usually ground level). These shrubs can be very late to emerge in the spring. If their tall woody branches are not desired for winter interest, cut them to about 2 feet in height, then clean up any remaining dead branches once growth starts in the spring. Most grow up to 6 feet, while newer compact varieties grow up to 3 feet in height.
Cinquefoil (Potentilla)
Blooms: July - SeptFull Sun      
A great shrub for the border. This low grower is very hardy, tolerating most soils, cold and drought. Known for its profuse yellow flowers in summer, Potentilla is diversifying its colour pallet, with white and pink varieties now available. Shape is very round and compact. Grows 2 to 3 feet.
Corkscrew Hazel (Corylus)
Blooms: MayFull Sun – Light Shade        
An unusual looking shrub with its crook- and corkscrew-shaped branches; a great conversation piece with attractive winter interest. This is a feature shrub and is best planted in a prominent location so you can admire its bizarre beauty year-round. In late winter, attractive catkins dangle from the gnarled branches. Prune in late winter to early spring (before the leaves appear) to thin or shape. If straight stems grow up from the base, remove them as they appear. Grows up to 9 feet high and wide. 
Cotoneaster - Cranberry (Cotoneaster Apiculata)
Blooms: May - JuneFull Sun - Part Shade        
Early pink blooms cover this low spreading shrub, followed by dark glossy green foliage that turns brilliant orange-red in fall. Can be used for covering slopes, cascading over walls or in-between other specimens in the shrub border. Fall berries are a vibrant cranberry-red colour appearing in late summer to early fall. Prune in late winter to early spring (before the leaves appear) removing up to one third as needed. During the growing season you can occasionally remove thinning inner branches to promote young vigorous growth or trim to shape, however prune no later than mid-August. Grows 2 to 3 feet tall and up to 6 feet wide.
Deutzia – Compact
Blooms: May - JuneFull Sun - Part Shade       
A compact shrub that is perfect for the shrub border, with an incredible show of white flowers on erect branches in spring, followed by orange-red foliage for the fall months. Prune winter die-back immediately after flowering, as Deutzia bloom on old growth. Best in full sun. Grows up to 3 feet.
Dogwood (Cornus)
Blooms: May - JuneFull Sun - Part Shade       
Known for its bright red twigs in winter, this very adaptable shrub also features yellow-white blooms in late spring and distinct blue or white berries in fall. Its fibrous root system is used to stabilize hills and can also tolerate standing water. Dogwoods can have green or variegated foliage. They can have about one third pruned off each spring to keep a tightly compact habit; in late fall, prune a few branches off for your winter greens pots! For even brighter stems, prune off the older, less colourful branches every three to four years. Most varieties grow 4 to 8 feet in height. The Native Pagoda Dogwood has dark green leaves and can be used as an upright shrub or small tree. Grows up to 15'.
Dwarf Burning Bush (Euonymus a. compacta)
Blooms: MayFull Sun - Part Shade          
The most recognized shrub in the fall, with its brilliant show of scarlet leaves. Adaptable to most soils, this shrub will show best in full sun. Yellow-green blooms give way to small oval leaves in summer and orange berries in fall, with winged and textured twigs giving even more interest in winter. Naturally-shaped pruning not required, however you may prune in late winter to early spring (before leaves start to appear) to control its size. Can grow 5 to 6 feet tall and up to 8 feet wide.
Elderberry (Sambucus)
Blooms: June – JulyFull Sun – Light Shade     
The Elderberry's decorative foliage ranges in colours from almost black to bright golden yellow, with contrasting creamy pale-pink flower clusters in summer. Use as an eye-catching display in the shrub border, as a specimen planting, or for contrasting background colour. Foliage shows best in full sun locations. They prefer moist, well-drained soil but can tolerate standing water for short periods of time. Regular pruning is required to keep them dense, compact, and bushy. Prune in late winter to early spring, before leaves start to appear; if they are extremely overgrown or lacking vigour, a heavy rejuvenation pruning is recommended. Edible berry varieties produce purple-black berries in summer and are traditionally used to make wine, jams, jellies, and pies. Depending on the variety, Elderberry can grow 6 to 10 feet in height.
False Spirea (Sorbaria sem)
Blooms: July – AugustFull Sun – Full Shade      
A three-season colour changer! In spring, its feathery leaves are a bright chartreuse tinged with pink as new growth appears, turning green in summer and finally bronze in fall. Large white plume-like blooms rise above the foliage, covering the plant during the summer. Use for mass planting, in a shrub border or as an informal hedge or screening. False Spirea is a fast grower with a spreading, mounding growth habit that requires occasional maintenance and upkeep. It is best pruned in late winter once the threat of extreme cold has passed. Grows 3 feet tall and up to 6 feet wide. 
Forsythia
Blooms: AprilFull Sun          
Forsythias are one of the most stunning spring flowering shrubs. Bright yellow blooms appear on braches in early spring before the leaves appear. Great as a background shrub or as a informal hedge. Prune to shape immediately after flowering. To control sporadic growth, prune a few of the oldest and thickest stems each year to promote new growth and more flowers. Grows up to 8 feet tall and wide.
  Hydrangea – Shrubs Not Available (we only carry Climbing Hydrangea vine)
Japanese Maple (Acer palmatum)
Blooms: MayFull Sun - Light Shade           
A distinctive specimen, plant in a focal location protected from harsh winter winds. Reaching up to 18 feet tall, the slow growing Japanese Maple features small purple flowers in spring and deep purple-red foliage that turns bright red in the fall. Cut-leaf varieties have delicate reddish-purple fern-like leaves on arching stems, creating a mounding mushroom form that reaches 5 feet in height and width. Both prefer dappled shade and moist, well-drained soil that is high in organic matter. Japanese Maples require protection from spring frosts, burning sun, and strong winds. Wrap with burlap once leaves have fallen to protect from winter die-back. Prune to shape and remove any die-back once the leaves have emerged in spring. Water regularly especially in times of drought.
Kerria (Japonica Pleniflora)
Blooms: May - JunePart Shade – Full Shade                  
This shrub loves the shade, and its showy, fully double yellow blooms are perfect to brighten up the shadows. Kerrias show beautiful emerald green stems during winter but requires winter protection during the coldest months. Prune winter die back directly after flowering as blooms appear on old growth. Fully grown, this shrub will reach 7 feet tall and spread to 10 up to feet.
Lilac (Syringa)
Blooms: MayFull Sun            
Lilacs announce the arrival of spring with their high fragrance and alluring tiny flowers that make up large plume-like clusters. Great as cut flowers, Lilacs range in colours from white, pink, magenta, lavender and purple. The French Lilac is the most popular variety, growing 8 to 10 feet tall and up to 8 feet wide. Dwarf Korean Lilacs and Bloomerangs reach only 5 feet in height while offering the same fragrant and profuse flowers; Bloomerangs also have the added benefit of an extended flowering season. For all Lilacs, immediately remove spent blooms after flowering so they can devote their energy to producing new flower buds for next spring; shearing to shape can be done at this time as well. Overgrown plants benefit from thinning; prune older branches every few years after flowering.
Mock Orange (Philadelphus)
Blooms: JuneFull Sun - Part Shade                    
This shrub should be planted where its sweet, early summer scent can be enjoyed. This vase-shaped, coarsely textured shrub features its semi-double aromatic white blooms on arching branches. Prune and thin right after flowering for best results. Grows to 7 feet.
Ninebark (Pysocarpus)
Blooms: May - JuneFull Sun                                
This upright shrub features creamy white blooms and textured reddish-purple leaves. It is best known for its wonderful coppery peeling bark in winter. A fast growing shrub, Ninebark can be pruned to shape after flowering. Grows to 9 feet.
Purpleleaf Sandcherry (Prunus)
Blooms: MayFull Sun
Soft pink flowers on dark purple branches. After blooming, deep reddish-purple foliage creates great contrast in the garden. To keep a dense habit, prune immediately after flowering every year. Grows to 6 feet.
  Rosh Bushes – Not Available
Rose of Sharon (Hibiscus)
Blooms: Aug - SeptFull Sun - Part Shade           
Grown for its late season show of 2 - 4” flowers, this moderate growing erect shrub thrives in a rich well-drained soil. Can be slow to leaf out in the spring and may suffer die-back from winter exposure; protecting with burlap wrappings is beneficial. Pruning can be done in spring to remove winter kill and to keep its shape (down to a few buds per stem for increased flowers) as the blooms will appear on the new growth. If left un-pruned, Hibiscus may reach up to 20 feet.
Serviceberry (Amelanchier Canadensis)
Blooms: MayFull Sun - Part Shade
Very showy all year round! Serviceberries have attractive white flowers in the spring, purple-red berries in the summer, and brilliant yellow to red foliage in the fall. Serrviceberries are very low-maintenance. Prune after flowering or in very early spring if necessary. Grows 20 to 25 feet tall.
Smoke Bush (Cotinus)
Blooms: June - JulyFull Sun
Unusual pinkish-purple plumes that resemble puffs of smoke. Purple or chartreuse foliage changes to bright red-orange in the fall. Stunning specimen plant. Prune in early spring to keep full and bushy. Grows 15 to 25 feet tall.
Spirea - 'Bridalwreath' and Small Mounding
Blooms: June - AugFull Sun                               
These shrubs have it all! Small Mounding Spireas are compact and hardy with a long bloom season. They tolerate most soils, with flowers coming in pink-purple hues and foliage from green to gold. The much larger ‘Bridalwreath’ variety features white flowers against green foliage on arching branches. Spirea's faded blooms can be sheared off in late fall or early spring, and larger varieties can have up to one third removed to control their size and shape. Small Mounding Spireas grow up to 2 feet; Bridalwreath reaches 8 feet.
Weigela
Blooms: July - AugFull Sun                                
Weigela is a showy shrub with a long blooming season of profuse tubular flowers in shades of pink or red. Attractive to Hummingbirds! The pointed  leaves can be green or tinged with bronze or purple. Prune annually after flowering to keep it looking full and bushy. Varieties range from 2 to 7 feet tall.